Tag Archives: Floyd Mayweather

Defensive wizards Floyd Mayweather and Wladimir Klitschko continue to rule their respective weight classes

7 May
As featured on NewsNow: Boxing news

Sam Janes – Leicester

Last weekend we saw OnTheBeak’s top two Pound for Pound fighters enter the ring for the first time in 2013, with Floyd Mayweather Jr outclassing Robert Guerrero over 12 after Wladimir Klitschko overpowered and eventually knocked Francesco Pianeta out in the sixth. Both men retained their Ring Magazine titles and further more cemented their status as untouchable in their own weight class.

Credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

Credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

There are plenty of similarities between Mayweather and Klitschko, despite the huge gulf in weight. Firstly, they are both masters of defence. Mayweather’s head movement, speed and shoulder roll have resulted in him only being knocked down once (versus Carlos Hernandez at super featherweight) in 2001. Since then no man has knocked Floyd to the canvas or defeated him. Shane Mosley, Oscar de la Hoya and Miguel Cotto have had limited success, but as Max Kellerman noted on ESPN.com after Mayweather’s controversial first fight with Jose Luis Castillo in 2004: “Mayweather is so seldom hit cleanly in his face”, which shows how hard it is to score against ‘Pretty Boy Floyd’.

Wladimir has tightened up his defence since his surprise defeat to Lamon Brewster by TKO in 2004; Emmanuel Steward turned him into a clinical, safe fighter who has won 18 on the bounce since that loss. ‘Dr Steelhammer’ keeps his distance as a fighter, sticking to his rock hard jab which no fighter has been able to get around, as David Haye found out in 2011.

Both fighters are now unquestionably the number one fighter in their division, despite both facing accusations of being boring fighters. Mayweather was booed frequently on Saturday night for failing to knock Guerrero out or share exchanges, and Klitschko has been accused of widely outpointing opponents or picking them off late, but failing to provide any genuine excitement.

Getting involved in wars is not a part of Mayweather or Klitschko’s DNA and this is one of the main reasons the two of them have amassed so many victories and belts. Both have also been accused of picking safe fights over recent years, preferring to protect their records rather than truly challenge themselves. Critics point to Pianeta’s lack of contender credentials and Guerrero’s win over ex welterweight belt-holder Andre Berto being the sole reason for getting a chance at Mayweather as being poor mismatches for fights, and these critics are right.

But this is not the fault of either fighter.

Floyd and Wladimir have beaten the majority of quality fighters available to them. Klitschko has beaten (and is planning to beat Povetkin in September) every genuine heavyweight challenge who doesn’t share his surname. David Haye, the last genuinely deserving challenger, was outmatched by the dominant Ukrainian in comfortab fashion. Floyd has beaten legend after legend in De La Hoya, Gatti and Mosely but people argue his inability to fight Manny Pacquiao or move up to face Alverez or Martinez signals Mayweather’s reluctance to risk his record.

If Klitschko beats Povetkin in September, there is very little out there for him to fight in an even contest. Deontey Wilder and Tyson Fury are developing well but by the time the two of them have truly peaked in ability, Wladimir should be well retired. Until retirement, Klitschko has very little option but to keep beating undeserving challengers.

Fortunately for Wladimir, his fights are so popular on German TV he is paid exceptionally well whoever he fights, so he has very little incentive to go looking for riskier fights with Fury and Wilder.

Credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

Credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

Mayweather, however, has a host of potential opponents from Pacquiao, Martinez and Alverez to up-and-comers like Danny Garcia and Amir Khan. All these fighters are desperate for a chance to take on  “Money” and the PPV revenue he brings.

Again, Floyd offers such a dedicated fan-base that means whoever he fights he can expect well over $10,000,000 in PPV revenue*, so Floyd can decide to take the lower risk fights as it is equally as lucrative.

Despite both essentially clearing out their divisions based on solid fundamentals and defence, the pair will continue to be criticised for taking an easy road. This is unlikely to change unless one gets beaten, but this looks very unlikely over the next couple of years. Mayweather and Klitschko are so big in the sport that they can fight anyone they like and make millions in revenue. They have achieved everything that has been asked of them and so, if they do take a few more comfortable fights and ride off into retirement with their money, I’d argue they’ve earned every right.

*The six-fight Showtime deal Mayweather signed earlier in the year was reported to fetch the athlete a guaranteed $200m over 30 months, with potentially an extra $10m per fight in PPV revenue.

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Floyd Mayweather releases heavy bag training video ahead of Robert Guerrero fight

4 Apr

Five-division world champion Floyd Mayweather Jr, 36, released a 95-second long window into his training regimen earlier today, Thursday, April 5, on his official YouTube channel. The 43-0-0, 26ko welterweight, a defensive specialist, takes on mandatory WBC challenger Robert Guerrero for the 147lb belt on May 4, one year minus a day since Money’s last outing; a successful decisioning of respected Puerto Rican Miguel Cotto.

(Video embedded above credit – YouTube, FloydMayweather)

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Robert Guerrero training at Lake Tahoe to show world ‘beating Selcuk Aydin can be done’

5 Jun

On The Beak – Admin

Robert ‘The Ghost’ Guerrero (29-1-1, 18ko) headed out to South Lake Tahoe yesterday for training camp in order to prepare for his upcoming bout with Selcuk ‘Mini Tyson’ Aydin (23-0-0, 17ko). On July 28 at the HP Pavilion in San Jose, California, the WBC interim welterweight title will be on the line with the winner being the mandatory challenger to face WBC champion at 147lbs; Floyd Mayweather.

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Skillful southpaw Guerrero aims to add more belts to his ever-increasing wardrobe in July

“This is my big opportunity to show the world that I belong with the elite fighters in boxing,” Guerrero said. “Everyone says it can’t be done, but I’m going to show the world skipping super lightweight and going straight to welterweight with no tune up to challenge the number one contender and beating Selcuk Aydin can be done!

“I’m here to face the toughest challenges and put myself in a position to get mega-fights. It’s not going to be easy beating a full-fledged welterweight [so] that’s why my team and I will get the proper training, sparring and diet when [at] camp. The mountains of Tahoe are set at high elevations which will make for a great training camp.

“I look forward to making history for the Bay Area and all my fans across the world.”

Lake Tahoe is a large freshwater lake in the Sierra Nevada of the United States. At a surface elevation of 6,225 ft (1,897 m), it is located along the border between California and Nevada, west of Carson City. This will be Robert’s first time training in the Tahoe area and he looks forward to having a tremendous camp.

Manager Bob Santos said: “Team Guerrero would like to thank Showtime and Golden Boy for putting this event on at the HP Pavilion in San Jose. When you speak of a fighter who has competed in six different weight classes from 122 to 147 as Guerrero is doing, it’s something special. I believe the only other active fighters that have done it are Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather. Guerrero is a five-time world champion in three divisions and has all the makings of superstar.”

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Austin Trout aims to steal show with Delvin Rodriguez but labels him a keeper of the gate that guards Mayweather, Canelo and K9

3 Jun

Words: Robert Delgado – Los Angeles

Photos: Esther Lin/Showtime

Defending WBA junior middleweight champion of the world, Austin Trout, is hoping a win over challenger Delvin Rodriguez – whose stock is currently high following his two dust-ups with Pawel Wolak last year – will elevate him from title-holder to emerging star. Trout takes on Rodriguez on Saturday, June 2 at the Home Depot Center in Carson, California but Delvin believes his experience against southpaw fighters will make a difference when it’s time to trade.

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Trout has a slender weight advantage as he scaled in at 152.8lbs (1.2lbs under the 154 limit) while Delvin registered 151lbs

The bout between Trout (24-0-0, 14ko) and Rodriguez (26-5-3, 14ko) may not be the headlining fight on a Showtime bill that also includes Antonio Tarver versus Lateef Kayode, Winky Wright against Peter Quillin and Leo Santa Cruz taking on Vusi Malinga, but Austin believes it will be the one most remembered by those at the gate and fans watching at home: “It’s going to be a great night of fights and I feel like me and Delvin are going to be the show-stealers.”

Breaking down his contest with Rodriguez, Trout said: “We know Delvin is a very high-action, fast-paced fighter, so we’re going to have to take that pace and step it up a notch. We need to keep our combinations moving and our footwork. We need to use our feet. We don’t want to stay right in front of him, but we don’t want to run either.

“I think this is the hardest fight to date that I’ve had in my career. Delvin is a world class fighter. I’ve watched him on TV as a fan and I know the type of challenge that’s coming forward. This is the toughest fight of my life [because] Delvin doesn’t fight the same every fight. He changes his style and he adapts. He’s a smart fighter. I don’t think I’ve ever fought anybody that has the diversity that Delvin does.”

Trout, though, prepared for a multi-dimensional prizefighter by varying the styles of those he sparred with during training camp: “We [got] ready with a bunch of different styles of sparring partners. In case he wants to box, we work on cutting the ring off. If he wants to bang, we have an idea that we want to do for that. We make our own camp diverse.”

Not only could the fight produce a battle of blows, but also see a war for position inside that squared circle

Rodriguez concurred with Trout’s assessment about the quality of their match-up: “It’s going to be a great fight. I have respect for him; he’s an undefeated champion [but] I’m hungry for a world title. I just got to do what I do. I have to go in there and put my combinations together. I haven’t had any problems against lefties. He has good movement, always aware of where he is in the ring [and] a fine champion [with] a lot of skills. I’m facing someone that I know I can’t make any mistakes [against] and I definitely cannot look past him.”

Whilst Rodriguez is solely focussed on what he will be looking at from the blue corner to the red on fight night, Trout is hoping the Showtime appearance could lead to unification fights in the future: “I want to get the rest of those belts,” he said.

“To be the true champion, you have to have them all. I’m looking at Canelo [Saul Alvarez], I’m looking at K9 [Cornelius Bundrage] and, of course, everybody is looking at Floyd [Mayweather], but first I got to get past Delvin to make any of this possible. I look at Delvin as the gatekeeper. He’s the one who’s going to let me in or deny me. I have to get through him to get those other belts.”

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Floyd Mayweather remains top PPV attraction as Miguel Cotto bout reaps 1,500,000 buys and $94m

11 May

On The Beak – Admin

HBO Sports has today reported that 1.5 million pay-per-view buys were generated from the May 5 super welterweight title fight between Floyd Mayweather and Miguel Cotto at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. The current buy rate total generated $94 million in PPV revenue and the performance of Mayweather-Cotto ranks as the second highest grossing non-heavyweight pay-per-view event in boxing history.

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Mayweather – Cotto second only to Mayweather – Oscar de la Hoya in terms of most watched non-heavyweight boxing match. Credit: Tom Hogan/Hogan Photos

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Studious Mayweather influenced by Mosley and Judah when combating Cotto

8 May

Words: Alan Dawson – London

All Photos: Will Hart/HBO

In order to negate the multi-dimensional boxing style that three-weight world champion Miguel Cotto possesses, Floyd Mayweather Jr followed a blueprint that was first formulated by former foes Shane Mosley and Zab Judah. Post-fight, the Money man credited Sugar Shane and Super Judah for his own success with the uppercut and right hook. The current incumbent of the WBA junior middleweight world title, Mayweather also lauded Cotto for his industriousness.

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Mayweather’s inclination to trade with Cotto allowed Miguel to gain more success than past Floyd opponents

Statistically, Cotto’s greatest round was the eighth, when he connected with 20/65 shots (31%)

On average, Mayweather’s opponents typically only land 16 percent of their punches, however, Cotto was able to achieve a greater percentage – 21 – as there were numerous moments in multiple rounds where Floyd would exit his traditional defensive posture and open up on Miguel.

Defending his title at 154lbs, Cotto produced a fan-friendly challenge… one which yielded fair numbers on the punch stats but, despite his pressure, he was still out-worked (May = 687 thrown, Cotto = 506) and out-landed (May = 179, Cotto = 105) by the challenger who, rightfully, left the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas as ring king.

Floyd, 35, who extended his undefeated streak in professional boxing to 43 fights with 26 big wins by way of knockout, was the first to acknowledge and respect Cotto, a pugilist who had faced criticisms for being ‘shot’ following defeats to Antonio Margarito and Manny Pacquiao in years past.

“When it’s pay-per-view, you want to give the fans excitement,” Mayweather said, before commenting on the blood he leaked – particularly from the nose – during the contest. “It comes with the territory. Miguel Cotto fought his ass off, Cotto was a tough competitor and I executed a gameplan and fought my heart out.

“Tonight I got a few bumps and bruises, but that is part of the sport. I could have made it a very easy fight, but I was going for the knockout. Cotto was in tremendous shape. He was tough, a good puncher. He didn’t win more than 30 fights for nothing. Cotto is a future hall of famer. I fought him at his weight. He’s tough, what can I say? He came to fight and not survival. When you come with offence, these things happen [but] I just bit down like a true champion.”

Considerable bleeding in a Mayweather fight is normally associated with the other man, not Floyd

Despite Cotto’s strength (75 of his shots landed were power punches) Mayweather was in control for the majority of rounds

A Las Vegas resident, Floyd is famed for his all hour training regimen at the Mayweather Boxing Club on Schiff Drive and lives by the motto of ‘hard work and dedication’. Exercising, road-work, pad-work with uncle/trainer Roger Mayweather are all fundamental aspects of camp, yet Mayweather showed his student side by admitting he “watched tapes of Shane Mosley [when he fought Cotto in 2007]” as well as studying Zab Judah.

“The right hook and the uppercut were working for me,” reflected Floyd on what precisely secured him victory against the game 31-year-old Puerto Rican. “I had watched tapes of Mosley and I saw that the right hook was working. And I also watch Zab Judah use the uppercut against him too. So I knew I was going to use those shots tonight. I knew the right hook was going to be my money shot. A lot of times and these days you don’t see fighters using the right hook, only the left. But tonight I wanted to use the right hook and that is what I did.”

Wrestler HHH (not pictured), Justin Bieber, Lil Wayne, 50 Cent and Yuriorkis Gamboa were honourary Money team members

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Ring Kings: Cotto bloodies Mayweather’s nose but Floyd stays pretty enough to win a UD and eighth world title

6 May

Denzil Stone – Atlantic City

Polarising pugilist Floyd Mayweather Jr produced a boxing masterclass on Saturday, May 5 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, unseating Miguel Cotto from the Puerto Rican’s throne as the king of the WBA junior middleweight division. Mayweather was almost un-hittable from the outside but, during the middle rounds, ventured into the inside and braved out a gutsy ruckus with Cotto who made Mayweather bleed for his winner’s money.

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Stone’s scorecard

Round 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Mayweather
10 10 10 10 10 9 10 9 10 10
10 10
Cotto
9 9 9
9 9 10 9 10 9 9 9 9

Official verdict: Mayweather via UD (117-111, 117-111, 118-110).

Floyd accepted a match-up at the full junior middleweight limit of 154lbs because he wanted defending WBA champion at his best, however, Mayweather also insisted on another factor that could have been perceived to favour the harder-hitting Cotto – 8oz gloves. Not content with that, Mayweather even took the extraordinary and extravagant measure to effectively handicap himself by sporting heavy red leather trunks. When fists met faces, it seemed none of that mattered to Money, as the man previously known as Pretty Boy barely broke a sweat despite completely outboxing Cotto throughout round one’s entirety.

While Cotto fought on the front-foot, Mayweather darted in and out of the pocket and landed jabs with his trademark precision. Floyd promised a toe-to-toe brawl during the pre-fight promotion and, for large portions of the second round, Mayweather boxed with his back to the ropes, refusing to use the full space of the ring and, when he wasn’t reintroducing gloves to Cotto’s lips (even landing an astonishing six punch combo), he was proving to be an elusive and downright frustrating target.

Mayweather’s defence was, simply put, masterful. In the third round, for instance, Cotto attempted to put his punches into bunches but the head-bound shots were harmlessly parried away with Floyd’s shoulder-rolling stance. Although his defence rightly wins plaudits, Mayweather’s defence is equally adept, as Cotto will no doubt testify too when he was just as helpless defending against four punch flurries that included uppercuts and straights as he was when attempting to land something, anything, cleanly.

In round five Cotto attempted to enhance his punch output, but showing great reserves of will, Mayweather again met him punch for punch. The only difference, of course, was that Mayweather landed cleanly whereas Cotto couldn’t connect. With 35 seconds remaining on round five, Miguel caught Floyd with a left hand. Such a solid strike, though, was notable purely because it occured so seldomly, even when the two engaged in trench warfare.

Using the box-and-move method that worked so emphatically against Antonio Margarito in New York last Christmas, Cotto enjoyed a significant sixth, relinquishing the centre of the ring to Floyd as he danced sideways, stuck out the jab and did just enough to register a winning round. In the seventh, Mayweather returned to winning ways by reverting to outside fighting and utilising his reach advantage but in the eighth, the aggression was all from Cotto, backing Floyd into corners and inflicting a seemingly relentless barrage of blows into his skull. When Mayweather returned to his stool, the damage had taken it’s toll as his nose was bleeding considerably yet he turned to the cameras and smiled.

Mayweather counter-punched his way to the ten score in round nine and stalked Cotto in round ten. In the final two rounds Mayweather did what he does best; diluting his opponent’s best strengths, deflating their confidence and fortifying his already industry-leading plus-minus ratio. There was little question who was going to prevail when the scorecards were to be announced, with Floyd winning a convincing unanimous decision.

With his victory over Cotto – his 43rd in his professional career – Mayweather rose to 43-0-0, 26ko while Cotto suffered his third defeat and dropped to 37-3-0, 30ko.

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Fight Photos: Amity descends into hostility as Mayweather and Cotto get heated at weigh-in

5 May

Photos: Tom Hogan/Hogan Photos (unless otherwise stated)

Words: Petra Kirsch – Gelsenkirchen

During the promotion for the high-profile WBA junior middleweight world championship clash between defending titlist Miguel Cotto (37-2-0, 30ko) and challenger Floyd Mayweather Jr (42-0-0, 26ko), the latter had spoken out over the lack of excitement during segments of the popular HBO 24/7 series. Ahead of their May 5 showdown at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, the two pugilists finally got shirty after extended periods of amicable exchanges…

Direct link to article.

For only his second outing at jr middle, Mayweather registered a career-high weight of 151lbs, three pounds below the limit

Accustomed to the division, Cotto – making his fourth appearance at 154 – scaled in right on the limit

Both prizefighters looked in pristine shape, however, Floyd claimed Miguel looked drained at the weight

The smile-laden stare-down soon turned hostile as both May and Cotto verbally sparred

The weigh-in face off was in stark contrast to the respectful nature the two shared during the build-up to the event

Cotto holds his ‘Super’ WBA championship while Floyd holds the lightly-regarded WBC diamond belt – both titles on the line

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Badou Jack inspired by Mayweather Boxing Gym experience, wants to beat up Alexander Brand

3 May

On The Beak – Admin

Undefeated super middleweight Badou Jack “The Ripper” (10-0-0, 8ko) of Sweden says he’s planning on having a ball when he makes his ShoBox: The New Generation debut on Friday, May 11 against Colombia’s Alexander Brand (17-0-0, 15ko). The pair will meet at the “Shootout at Texas Station” card at the Texas Station Gambling Hall and Hotel in Las Vegas, headlined by Yudel Jhonson versus Willie “The Great” Nelson in a ten round 154lb fight.

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“He seems like a wild puncher who doesn’t have the best defense,” said Jack of opponent Brand. “I’m gonna beat him up and have fun. I like guys like this that throw wide shots.”

This will be Jack’s first fight at 168 lbs, but the former Olympian says he’ll have no trouble making weight, having done his preparation at Floyd Mayweather’s gym with trainer Eddie Mustafa Muhammad, and sparring with respected contenders like Ishe Smith and J Leon Love.

“To see how Floyd trains motivates me to work even harder. I feel good I like to mix it up, box and pressure my opponent. I can do it all and I can’t wait to show everybody my skills and put on an exciting fight for the crowd and the TV viewers. I’m learning so much from my trainer Eddie Mustafa. I’m definitely in my prime right now. I just need more experience.”

Jack says that while his victory is assured, it is Brand who will decide how things unfold. “It depends. If he’s trying to win, we’ll go home early, but if he runs and just tries to survive, sometimes it can be hard to stop a guy who don’t’ want to fight. I won’t go out there looking for the knockout, but if it comes, it comes.”

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Manager: Randall Bailey will KO Jones, has no fear of Mayweather and will KO Floyd and Pacquiao

2 May

On The Beak – Admin

Two-time world champion Randall “The Knock-out King” Bailey, arguably one of the biggest pound-for-pound single punchers in boxing, finally gets an opportunity to exorcise years of demon-like frustrations on Saturday, June 9 when he takes on unbeaten Mike Jones for the vacant IBF welterweight world championship, in the 12-round co-feature on the Manny PacquiaoTimothy Bradley pay-per-view card, live from MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.

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Bailey has the power to produce a kayo with one punch. Credit: Sumio Yamada

For years, Bailey (42-7-0, 36ko) has been considered too much of a risk for some of today’s brightest stars. Awesome, one-punch knockout ability will do just that to a fighter’s reputation like Bailey’s. Ask Jackson Isei Bonsu and Frankie Figueroa, two of Bailey’s 36 knockout victims who were out cold before they hit the mat after getting chin-checked by a powerful Randall right.

“Randall Bailey has been frustrated most of his career,” his longtime manager Si Stern said. “He is unquestionably the strongest puncher in the world today and, I know this may sound crazy to some, maybe in boxing history. Just look at his knockout record. He’s been shunned by a lot of top fighters out there today. Why? They know Randall can take them out with one punch. History tells us that dangerous punchers like Randall have always been avoided.

“Jones (IBF number one) didn’t want to fight Randall (IBF number two), either. The IBF pushed the issue and said that Jones had to fight Randall or he’d lose his world title shot. Once he wins the world title again – he was too young when he was world champion – he knows the money will follow and that’s what has kept Randall going.

“He has no fear of Mayweather, Pacquiao or any of the other top welterweights. Randall knows that he can knock out any of them because of his power. Mayweather doesn’t want to fight Randall, who loves stand-up fighters like Pacquiao. His past problems have been against opponents who hit and run. Guys who stand and fight have never been a problem for Randall.”

The 37-year-old Bailey, now promoted by DiBella Entertainment, made his pro debut in 1996, when Jones was sweet sixteen.  Randall won his first 21 pro fights, all by knockouts, including his WBO light welterweight title-winning performance against Carlos Gonzalez in 1999, followed by two successful title defenses against Hector Lopez and Rocky Martinez. In 2002, Bailey stopped Demetrio Ceballos in the third round to become the Interim WBA light welterweight champion.

After losing his IBF 140-pound title shot in 2009 to Juan Urango, Bailey moved up in weight to welterweight, and he is unbeaten in four fights in that division with three victories, including the Bonsu knockout in their IBF title eliminator, and a no decision.

“I pleaded with him to get out of the 140-pound division,” Stern note.  “He walks around at 154 pounds, so making weight is no longer a struggle for him at welterweight. I bet he’s within a few pounds of making weight for the Jones fight right now, working out in Florida with his trainer, John David Jackson. Jones has never fought anybody like Randall Bailey; he will knock out Jones.”

Five of Bailey’s seven career losses have been to world champions: Urango, Miguel Cotto, Ener Julio, and Diosbelys Hurtado. Randall has defeated three world champions: Gonzalez, Corley, and Juan Polo Perez.

Like fine wine, Randall Bailey keeps getting better with age, something Stern believes Jones will discover June 9, probably at the end of single, concussive punch.

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